Frequently Asked Questions

OK, let's be honest: This blog is brand new, so there are no frequently asked questions. There are no infrequently asked questions either. But hypothetically, what might be asked?

Your title doesn't make any sense.

Not really a question, but OK.

If we write a number as a product of prime numbers, then we have factorised the number into its prime components. For example:

126 = 7 × 3 × 3 × 2

See?

Yeah, I knew that. But you spell 'factorization' wrong.

Again, not a question.

This might come up a bit on this blog. I put 's' where some people put 'z'. I spell like an Australian because, well, I'm an Australian. I'll also use 'maths' instead of 'math'. I hope you can cope with that.

Even so, you can't factorise a person.

Really not getting the question thing, are you?

To be honest, I have no idea what the title of this blog is supposed to mean. I have a vague idea of what it could mean, but not really clear enough to put down here. I chose the domain primefactorisation.com before I figured out anything else, so I guess that's what happens when you don't plan ahead.

Did you deliberately phrase all the previous questions as statements, just so you could get snarky at an imaginary person?

Yeah, I did. Sorry about that.

author

Shaun used to be maths, IT and ocassional physics teacher at a small P-12 school (primary and secondary) in rural Victoria, Australia. He is currently in the process of starting his career again in the United States.

more about me

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my website

The place where I put other stuff, usually math related coding:

primefactorisation.com

my other blog

My journey from Australia to the United States:

Dropping the S

my wife's blog

Sarah is also a math teacher, and she's much better at this blogging thing than I am:

Math Equals Love

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Shaun Carter
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